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Posts Tagged ‘Miami Heat’

Jazz at Heat 12-16-13Final Score: Heat 117, Jazz 94

Run It Back (Jazz Superlatives)

Player of the Game: Alec Burks scored a career-high 31 points on 12-17 shooting from the field, 5-8 from the foul line and 2-4 from behind the arc. He also added 7 assists, 4 steals and just 2 turnovers.

If it wasn’t for #6 in the red jersey, Burks’ level of play offensively would have easily made him the best player on the court. What made his performance so impressive was his efficiency combined with the fact he had to do it on his own rather than benefit from utilizing a system that placed him in advantageous situations.

Of Burks’ 12 field goals – the over-whelming majority came from open-court or 1-on-1 opportunities:
1. Burks intercepts a Mario Chalmers pass and takes it the other way for a layup.
2. Burks drives around Battier, spins by LeBron and hits a floater over the out-stretched arm of Bosh.
3. Burks drive and step-back 20-footer over Ray Allen to close out 1st-qtr.
4. Burks pokes ball away from Norris Cole from behind resulting in 2-on-1 Jazz fastbreak that Burks capped with a hanging layup against Bosh.
5. Baseline drive from right-corner past Wade and by LeBron for soaring reverse layup.
6. Baseline drive past Wade from left wing for hanging reverse-layup.
7. Loose-ball from an errant Garrett pass is tracked down by Marvin who kicks to Burks in corner for open three.
8. Baseline drive past Allen from right corner and hanging layup against Rashard Lewis and Birdman.
9. Steal and emphatic fastbreak dunk against a late Birdman contest.
10. 1-on-1 drive against Chris Bosh originating from top-of-the-key for another smooth extending left-handed layup.

Only two of Burks’ field goals were products of well-executed half-court sets:
1. A Burke/Favors high screen-roll results in a kickout to Burks where he took advantage of a reckless Chalmers close-0ut to drive down the lane and finish with the left-hand over Bosh.
2. Burke/Kanter high screen-roll results in swing pass to Burks on weakside for three.

This discrepancy is largely due to what has become Utah’s offensive identity – which is basically a series of multiple screen-rolls and dribble-handoffs originating from outside the three-point line. That style had success against Sacramento and Denver but played right into Miami’s hands defensively – where the Heat’s ball-hawking speed and athleticism feasted on Utah’s perimeter players in screen-roll with their aggressive traps resulting in turnovers and stalled possessions more often than not. Gordon Hayward and Trey Burke struggled the most at making quick and deft passes before Miami’s length and aggressiveness could sink their teeth into them.

Given the scenario – the Jazz desperately needed Burks to do what he does best which is attack with the basketball and he did so at an all-star caliber level.

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Best Play: 5:51 4th-Qtr – From the top-of-the-key, Alec Burks beats LeBron down the lane where he draws the help-defense of Chris Bosh and dishes to Favors, who absorbs contact with Rashard Lewis with his left-shoulder while converting the layup for a 3-point play opportunity. Considering the opponent and degree-of-difficulty by both Burks and Favors – to me that may have been the most impressive play of the entire Jazz season.

Best Shot: 10:59 2nd-Qtr – In a pick&roll with Burks, Enes Kanter caught a pass at the elbow, put the ball on the floor then pulled up for a 10-foot jumper on his first shot of the night. After clearly struggling since being replaced in the starting lineup, Kanter hit his first shot and was a force in his limited time (17 minutes) scoring 14 points and pulling down 8 rebounds. In 8 minutes in the 2nd-qtr, he had 10 points and 7 rebounds as the Jazz out-scored the Heat 22-10 in that stretch.

Best Pass: 8:51 2nd-Qtr – In one of Utah’s best screen-rolls of the night, Miami trapped a Burks/Evans high pick&roll with Wade and Lewis, but Burks made a crafty side-arm pass to Evans slipping to the basket for a 5-footer.

Of Burks’ 7 assists, 3 came in the first 3-minutes of the 2nd-Qtr where Miami showed out hard on him and he hit the screener going towards the basket. Over the course of the game Miami tightened their defense to take away those automatic would-be assists until late, where Burks picked up his final 2 assists on screen-roll with less than 5 minutes remaining in the 4th-qtr.

Best Block: 10:08 3rd-Qtr – In transition, Derrick Favors did a terrific job against LeBron by what you call “corralling the dribbler” – where you build a corral or barrier while retreating on defense that limits where LeBron can drive . LeBron still tried to split Marvin and Favors and his layup attempt was stuffed by Favors.

Best Execution: 7:04 3rd-Qtr – The Jazz finally executed a high-low. With Rush trying to enter the ball to Favors who was being fronted by Bosh on the left-block, Marvin Williams flashed to the top-of-the-key where he had the angle to throw a lob pass to Favors at the rim. Favors caught the pass and finished with a dunk while also picking up a touch foul against Bosh.

I’m not exaggerating when I say I could probably count on one hand how many times the Jazz have executed a high-low in the past season-and-a-half (with most of them coming between Favors&Kanter). Long overdue but good to see.

Quote of the Night: “This is Alec Burks, he’s in the game along with Trey Burke. Could get a little confusing.”
-Heat play-by-play announcer Eric Reid, who has no idea how confusing it’s been for the Jazz’s own TV crew.

Odds and Ends

  • Alec Burks’ 31 points tied John Drew (1983), Thurl Bailey (1987), and Matt Harpring (2007) for the 18th-highest scoring game off-the-bench in franchise history.
  • American Airlines Arena in Miami was also the location of Paul Millsap’s (46 points) and Andrei Kirilenko’s (31 points) career-high scoring performance.
  • Burks joins Gordon Hayward as only two players on the team to have a 30-point game as a Jazz player.
  • Derrick Favors shot 8-12 (67%) to raise his FG% to 53% for the season. The Jazz have not had a starter shoot 53% or better since Paul Millsap in 2010-11.
  • After shooting 13-23 from three in Sacramento and 6-7 from deep in the 1st-Qtr in Denver – the Jazz have shot just 13-52 (25%) from behind the arc in their last 11 quarters. They’re better than that so this is likely a momentary rough patch – but it was also highly unlikely they were going to continue shooting in the mid-40’s.
  • Also, if you’re logged onto twitter and you want some chuckles go do a twitter search for “Harpring” and “LeBron”

The Final Word

With 10-minutes to play in the 4th-quarter, the Jazz were within 7 points of the Miami Heat. At that point, Dwayne Wade had started to overwhelm the Jazz in the post and the rest of the Heat kicked into high-gear and went on a 32-9 spurt to close the game.

For the past two seasons, the Jazz organization constantly told their fans that the “Core-4” wasn’t ready and that in order to develop they needed time to learn by watching and playing behind “veterans” such as Randy Foye, Raja Bell, Josh Howard, Paul Millsap and Al Jefferson. Now in 2013-14, the struggling Jazz routinely experience 2nd-half meltdowns with the reasoning being that they simply are too inexperienced to do better – which shouldn’t be the case with all of that valuable time they had to learn by watching from the bench.

I don’t fault Utah for losing badly to a defending champion Heat squad clearly on a different level than the Jazz, but the fact that “inexperience” is still being used as reasoning behind much of Utah’s 6-21 start shows the idea that young players must learn from watching veterans for 3 seasons before being fully thrown into the fire was silly then and silly now. The Jazz are young and lack experience in their most-talented players and have benefited little from their watch&learn approach with 2nd and 3rd-year players.

Last night was the type of game that serves as real developmental experience. After the second-unit (led by Alec Burks and Enes Kanter) put the Jazz in prime position with an 8-point 2nd-quarter lead, the Miami Heat began playing defense at their relentless championship-caliber level igniting a series of fastbreak dunks to seemingly regain control. The Jazz countered with a Burke-to-Favors transition layup (where Favors was likely fouled on the play as well) and a gorgeous Burks lefty-layup against a challenging Bosh to help rebuild a 50-45 halftime lead.

Utah’s young players can learn more from those moments competing against the Heat at their absolute best than they can by sitting and watching from the bench as mediocre veterans struggle on the court or from any blowout victory over a short-handed Sacramento team.

Players like Trey Burke and Gordon Hayward can learn how to attack and protect the ball against an aggressive pick&roll defense. Derrick Favors can continue to gain confidence learning how to find the vulnerable spots in Miami’s incredibly quick help-defense. Alec Burks and Enes Kanter can reinforce their confidence by knowing they have the physical tools and skills to score at the highest of levels.

It’s not evident in the final score, but this was a game the future of the team needs to experience first-hand if they hope to one day compete consistently at or near the level the Heat are at. It’s only a shame it took this long for many of them to receive opportunities like that.

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The Pacers did a lot of good things in their 103-102 overtime loss in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference Finals, but even prior to LeBron’s game-winning layup – one basic play with a clever twist caused them significant problems defensively. Late in the game, Miami ran an unconventional variation of high screen-roll with LeBron and Wade. Instead of a bigman (or pseudo-big like Battier in their small-ball lineup), the Heat opted to utilize their guard as the screener for Dwayne Wade and LeBron James – and the Pacers were unable to stop it either time.

Heat high screen roll #1

#1. The Heat bring Ray Allen up to screen for Wade. Wade’s defender – Sam Young – choses to go over the screen which puts the defensive pressure on Allen’s man – George Hill (circled). Hill, a point used to fighting over picks – not having his man set on-ball screens, is playing the screener softly. As a result, Hill isn’t in a position to show-out hard which would force Wade to elongate his path and give Young a chance to recover. (Also, why Young would go over on a screen 26-feet from the basket is beyond me.)

Heat high screen roll #2

#2. As a result, Hill’s choices are to pick up Wade and allow Allen to pop out for an open three, or recover on Allen and trust the help-defense behind him.

Heat high screen roll #3

#3. Hill opts to go after Allen – giving Wade a wide-open lane to the basket.

Heat high screen roll #4

#4. The only strongside help-defender in position to impede Wade is David West, and West opts not to leave Shane Battier (camped in the deep right corner) and Wade scores an uncontested layup to put Miami up 2 with 43-seconds remaining.

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Fast-forward to overtime. Again the score is tied – this time with under 20-seconds remaining. Out of a timeout Erik Spoelstra again calls for a high-screen roll – this time with point guard Norris Cole coming up to screen for LeBron.

Heat high screen roll - OT #1

#1. The Pacers have a different strategy this time – to switch it with point guard George Hill (6-2/190) picking up LeBron (6-8/250).

Heat high screen roll - OT #2

#2. This is a huge mismatch as LeBron can power past Hill. Indiana opted to take 7-2 shotblocker Roy Hibbert out of the game to match up with the Heat’s “small-ball” – so David West is again the strong-side help-defender guarding Chris Bosh camped in the deep corner. The rest of the Pacers are matched up with quality 3pt-shooters spacing around the perimeter.

Heat high screen roll - OT #3

3. West half-heartedly helps off Bosh and LeBron blows past Hill for a go-ahead layup with 10-seconds remaining.

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Much will be made over the Pacers’ defense on the final possession in which LeBron easily scored the buzzer-beating layup – but their normally solid defense fell apart defending Miami’s unconventional screen-roll. It’s a brilliant wrinkle from Spoelstra’s standpoint as it put George Hill in uncomfortable and unusual (for a point guard) positions and involved their best 3pt-shooters (Allen/Cole) as the “pick&pop” man rather than a frontcourt player such as Bosh (28% 3pt-shooter) or the the cold-shooting Shane Battier (0-4 in Game 1 from behind the arc).

Close playoff games usually boil down to matchups and adjustments – and late in Game 1 Spoelstra clearly had the advantage over Pacers’ head coach Frank Vogel. It will be interesting to see how Vogel and the Pacers opt to defend this Wing/PG high screen-roll in the ensuing games. This is where NBA head coaches earn their paychecks. It can be argued if Frank Vogel’s late-game decisions lost the game for the Pacers – but Erik Spoelstra’s moves unquestionably won the game for Miami.

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